Questioning the Resurrection

Luke 20.27-21.4

The Sadducees’ question about the resurrection backfires. Jesus says there’s no doubt there will be a resurrection. God is faithful and will fulfill all that He has promised. Jesus will sit at the right hand of the Father, He will rule over the kingdom and His enemies will be crushed beneath His feet.

What the Sadducees considered a trick question because of their own doubt and misunderstanding is the central question of Christianity…is the resurrection real? The resurrection is central to our faith, and is our hope as Christians. If there is no resurrection, then eat and drink for tomorrow we die. If there is no resurrection, this life is all we have. If there is no resurrection there is no future kingdom, and our hope is only a fleeting and fading one. If there is no resurrection all the promises that God has made…are false, and frankly, we are all wasting our time here today.

Christianity rises and falls on the resurrection…first for Jesus, then for us. For Jesus to conquer sin and death, a resurrection is required. In the parable of the nobleman, Jesus says He goes away to receive His kingdom and then return, picturing His death, resurrection, ascension, and return. The promises made to the patriarchs can only be fulfilled for them if there is a resurrection. For us to live in the kingdom that both the OT and Jesus describe, there must be a resurrection. We know that God is faithful to His promises. Our hope is not in vain. We know that since Jesus was raised, we too will be raised with Him. And we will reign with Him in His kingdom. We know that there is a resurrection.

Knowing that the resurrection is real, it should affect the way live. We have a real hope in Jesus. Hope that this life is not the end. A hope that one day wrongs will be made right. No more tears or pain or sorrow. No death. Endless joy and unheard of satisfaction living life in the kingdom, serving and worshiping Jesus our King.

Knowing that the resurrection is real, we should live, not for the here and now, building our own kingdoms, selfishly grabbing all that we can get…but for the kingdom to come, willingly giving of ourselves and our resources, investing our mina in the lives of those who are around us.

Jesus is the resurrection and the life…our hope is in Him. If you have not yet trusted in Him, make today the day. Recognize that you are a sinner in need of repentance. Believe that Jesus can save you and trust Him to do so. The kingdom awaits.

Until next time…stay salty.

This post is based on a sermon from our series in the book of Luke. Download the podcast at: Central Christian Church Main Service, or follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter: @ccclancaster

Authority Questioned

Luke 20.1-18

Who’s in charge? By what authority do You do these things and who gave You the authority? The parable of the vine-growers is Jesus’ response to the question of authority. As the beloved Son of the Father, Jesus’ authority comes from God. Although He may be rejected by the religious leaders, Jesus is still the long-awaited King who brings the kingdom. And those who reject Him will face certain judgment.

The leaders didn’t want Jesus to be King. They questioned His authority. They rebelled against His sovereignty. But why? Why did they reject Jesus? If He is clearly the Hero they had been looking for all along, why didn’t they throw a big party and celebrate? Here’s my theory. Maybe they really didn’t want a King…maybe they didn’t want Someone messing with their stuff…maybe they liked being in charge. Sound familiar?

Jesus has all authority in heaven and on earth…the authority to forgive sins, the authority to give spiritual life, the authority to heal diseases and cast out demons and calm the storm and raise the dead. He has authority over every sphere of life. Jesus has authority, but do we recognize it? How often do you or I question Jesus’ authority in our own lives? Even though we may have made Him King, we still like to grab control at times, don’t we? When it comes to our relationships or our finances, do we really want Jesus to be King? When it comes to our careers or our popularity, do we really want to submit to His rulership? Do we really want to recognize His authority in every area of our lives? Is He really King?

Let me challenge you this week to ask yourself, have I given Jesus authority over every area of my life? If not, what areas are you holding back and why? The LORD is gracious and compassionate, slow to anger, abounding in lovingkindness and relenting of evil. He is Creator-God, and He knows what’s best. Do you believe that? Do you believe that He loves you and cares about the things that are impacting your life? Then why not surrender those areas you’ve been holding back and trust that He has your best interest at heart?

If you have not yet trusted in Jesus, don’t wait. The stone can be a place of refuge or source of destruction. Recognize your need for repentance. Believe that Jesus can save you, and trust Him to do so. Put Him in charge today.

Until next time…stay salty.

This post is based on a sermon from our series in the book of Luke. Download the podcast at: Central Christian Church Main Service, or follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter: @ccclancaster

Render to Caesar

Luke 20:19-26

“Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s.” Historians universally claim that these words from Jesus have been “the single most influential political statement ever made.” They have shaped western civilization. Both Peter (1 Peter 2.13-17) and Paul (Romans 13.1-7) expand on what Jesus said, giving “shape to the political world as we know it today.” Our responsibilities to God do not negate our civic duties, neither should our civic duties negate our responsibilities to God.

Jesus avoided the trap set by the pretenders by saying that we have a duty to both the state and to God. What Caesar claims is irrelevant unless it interferes with our duty to God. Jesus doesn’t tell us what to do when the two are in direct moral conflict. Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego’s handling of Nebuchadnezzar’s injunction against prayer (Dan. 3) and Daniel’s handling of a similar edict by Darius (Dan. 6) are great examples of what to do when the two spheres collide. When the choice is between obeying God or obeying man, we have to choose to obey God (Acts 5.28-29). If you, as a Christian, are asked to do something immoral or something that violates the Word of God, you should say “no”, but then be prepared to face the consequences. Just like Daniel and his buddies. And just like Christian martyrs have done throughout the centuries. Don’t give up, don’t give in, Jesus wins.

Fundamentally the question is: where is our hope? Is our hope in this broken, fallen world, or in the kingdom that Jesus brings? Are we looking for a king to save us in this political circus, or are we looking for the King who has already saved us?

And as those who follow Jesus, how do we engage the culture? What does it mean to live and love like Jesus? What’s our responsibility? First and foremost we have to remember that Jesus is our only Hope and our King. So we don’t give up, we don’t give in because we know that Jesus wins. And knowing that…We as followers of Jesus are called to submit to the governing authorities (Romans 13, 1 Peter 2). We are to be markedly law-abiding, even down to the traffic laws and paying taxes. Our obedience should be careful and prayerful…As Paul said to Timothy, “I urge, then, first of all, that requests, for prayers, intercession and thanksgiving be made for everyone—for kings and all those in authority, that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness” (1 Timothy 2:1, 2). In this country we have been given the right to vote…to let our voice be heard. We should exercise that right…prayerfully and intelligently. God is sovereign…but He chooses to use us in the process of accomplishing His purposes.

But we also need to confess our pride and our sinful attitudes…conversations, statements and responses that have reflected more fear than faith, more of my kingdom than God’s kingdom.

In a few weeks, we will have a new president…whoever that is we are called to pray for them and submit to their authority. May not be easy to do, especially if your candidate is not elected. But we have to trust God’s sovereignty. He’s still in control. Just as He was when Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego went into the fiery furnace. Just as He was when Daniel went into the lions’ den. Just as He was when Jesus hung on a cross.

Jesus says we are to give to Caesar what is Caesar’s. Are we doing so? Even more importantly, are we giving to God the things that are God’s?

Until next time…stay salty.

This post is based on a sermon from our Luke series, Live & Love Like Jesus. Download the podcast at: Central Christian Church Main Service, or follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter: @ccclancaster